Treatment of Hemorrhoids

The rectum is the final portion of the large intestine. It empties stool from the body through the anus. Hemorrhoids are “cushions” of tissue filled with blood vessels at the junction of the rectum and the anus. These vascular cushions can become swollen and inflamed, usually due to increased intra-abdominal pressure, such as during straining when constipated or during pregnancy. Such swelling can cause pain, bleeding, and itching. Hemorrhoid removal may be recommended when non-surgical treatment (fiber rich diet, laxatives, stool softener, suppositories, medications, warm baths) has not provided adequate relief from: persistent itching, anal bleeding, pain and or blood clots (thrombosis of the hemorrhoids).

hemorrhoids diagram

Hemorrhoidectomy

Surgery to remove hemorrhoids is called Hemorrhoidectomy. The surgeon makes small cuts around the anus to slice them away. You will receive local anesthesia (the area being operated on is numb, and you’re awake though relaxed) or general anesthesia (you’re put to sleep). Hemorrhoidectomy is often an outpatient procedure, and you can usually go home the same day. Because it’s highly sensitive near the cuts and you might need stitches, the area can be tender and painful afterward.

Recovery most often takes about 2 weeks, but it can take as long as 3 to 6 weeks to feel like you’re back to normal.

PPH is an alternative procedure for hemorrhoids removal

PPH is also called a stapled Hemorrhoidectomy. The doctor will use a stapler-like device to reposition the hemorrhoids and cut off their blood supply. Without blood, they’ll eventually shrivel and die.